Georgie’s 24 Hour “Walk for the Beaches”

On the 10th of July Georgie Leigh Furze will be walking for 24 consecutive hours to raise money for @communitynorthernbeaches . Here’s what Georgie has to say:

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“My name is Georgie Furze I am 27 years old from Manly . On Friday 10th July 2020 at 6pm I am going to walk for 24 consecutive hours to raise money for people struggling within The Northern Beaches Community and also for Mental health. Donations will be split between the two.

It has broken my heart to see so many businesses suffer due to this virus and mental health is something that I have always felt really strongly about. I want to do something for the community. My biggest passion In life is helping people, caring for others and fitness – If I’m not walking the beach, you will usually find me at the gym.

Any amount no matter how small will make a huge difference and help me get to my goal. I also have 24 , 1 hour time slots available (sponsor me) I will be walking with 24 different people, these people will walk with me for 1 hour – share their story, maybe they just might be there to support me or maybe this person will want to promote their small business that is now struggling due to the virus. These 24 interviews will all be filmed via GoPro and live streamed. This money is going to change lives and save lives, I can’t do it alone – I need your help. Please support me on my 24 hour walk for The Beaches Community & help me save those in need. Please help me Change a life & Save a life.”

Click on the buttom below to go to Georgie’s Go Fund Me Page to find out more about how you can donate;

Echo Hill Wine Fundraising Offer

100% Proceeds from wine sale to be donated to Community Northern Beaches

“Dear wine loving friends,

We at Echohill Vineyard have carefully matured some fabulous Chardonnay and Shiraz since 2012, and to help out some of the many people that are suffering hardship from the COVID19 virus we are offering the chance to acquire these wines that normally sell for $200 per case (and are rated 90-92 by James Halliday) to you for only $50 per case, delivered to your door (Sydney Area Only). All proceeds after delivery costs will go straight to the Community Northern Beaches to help support their Homeless Outreach Program.

We have a select number of cases of 2012, 2014 &2015 Chardonnay, and 2014 & 2015 Shiraz, all hand picked and matured in French Oak barrels.

If you would like to take up this offer then please email Sarah (s_day@bigpond.com) with the following information:
– how many cases you would like
– Your name, phone number and address

Then, kindly deposit your funds to the account below (ie. number of cases x $50 each). Your contribution will be much appreciated.

Echohill Farm

BSB: 032102

ACC: 659806

Many thanks

Steve, Sarah, Glen, Cath, David and Megan – The Day, Butler, Epper families”

Echo Hill Vineyard

Echo Hill Vineyard

Forest Rugby Club Gives Big to Community Northern Beaches!

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The Forest Rugby Club Charity day was a terrific success both on and off the field. On the field, Forest’s results on the day, including the all important first grade, saw them win promotion to the Kentwell Cup for season 2020. A number of teams are competing in the upcoming finals series and Community Northern Beaches wishes them all the best. Go Forest!

Off the field a ‘mad’ auction of the specially designed Charity Day jersey saw over $20,000 raised! No doubt the euphoria of the Wallabies beating the All Blacks, coupled with ample celebratory liquid amber
contributed to the success of the bidding. In addition a further $4000 was raised from a raffle conducted at the ground, and a further $670 in sponsorship was contributed from player Carl Kilbourne, who dragged his body along the City to Surf route the following day.

A framed Forest Charity Day jersey now sits proudly at Community Northern Beaches’ Centre in Manly. We would like to thank Forest Rugby for its continuing initiatives to support community organisations such as ours, which have raised well in excess of $100,000 over the last few years. As a community rugby club their efforts are truly inspiring.

Community Spotlight: Saskia Groen, Volunteer at Community Northern Beaches Crisis Drop-in

Photo: Saskia 'babysitting' Sammy whilst his Dad sought respite from rough sleeping to spend some necessary time in hospital.

Photo: Saskia ‘babysitting’ Sammy whilst his Dad sought respite from rough sleeping to spend some necessary time in hospital.

Today is Saskia Groen’s last regular Wednesday shift as a volunteer at Community Northern Beaches. We interviewed her about her role. Thank you for your huge contribution and for the mountains of kindness that you have shown to the guests of the Centre.

What is your role at Community Northern Beaches?

I am a volunteer on the reception desk. We are the meet and greet of the Centre. There are two of us in this role on any given shift and it’s always enjoyable and worthwhile.

How would you describe a typical day for you whilst volunteering?

Our role is to keep the little ‘drop-in’ part of Community Northern Beaches running with warmth and generosity. Our visitors include all sorts of people in need. Some are looking for a friendly face and a cup of tea, others need food clothes or bedding, some need important information and others need the help of the amazing staff. Whatever the need, it’s the job of the reception volunteers to make visitors, particularly those new to the Centre, feel welcome and safe. Sometimes our role is simply to give visitors a chance to sit and catch their breath.

What motivated you to get involved?

I have teenage sons. Six or so years ago I was driving along South Dowling Street in the city when I was approached at the traffic lights by a teenage boy asking for money. He was clearly sleeping rough and dealing with addition. I looked into this sweet, open, gentle boys eyes and saw my own kids. It was a pretty defining moment for me. I suddenly became so much more alert and conscious of the plight of homelessness, ever increasing numbers of Sydney’s rough sleepers, and the under resourcing of mental health services, rehab/detox, and social housing. I started as a volunteer for Missionbeat and soon became an employee. They are a city based homeless service so as a Seaforth resident I decided last year to support my own community as well and started as a volunteer with the amazing Community Northern Beaches.

Tell me about a particularly memorable moment during your time as a volunteer at the Centre?

Rough sleepers have usually been at the receiving end of judgment and disappointment so it often takes more than one visit for our visitors to trust enough to ask for assistance. So my most memorable moment is more like a sequence of moments – when I have been lucky enough to see an initially silent and withdrawn visitor finally turn to Daniel and share their situation and ask for help. Usually tears are involved.

What do you believe makes Community Northern Beaches special?

I think there is a genuine empathy and concern that both the staff and volunteers have for our visitors and for all people in need. I also think it’s rather lovely that the wider community on the Northern Beaches support the organisation as much as they do. Community Northern Beaches is clearly dear to the heart of our wider community which is really pretty wonderful.

What would your advice be to someone looking to reach out for help but doesn’t know where to start?

If you have a friend or relative you trust, share your concerns and needs with them. They may not know the answers but can walk alongside you as you start the next step. Then maybe get in contact with somewhere like Community Northern Beaches. Community centres are here to help you with the next step. And each step, no matter how small it may seem, is a movement in the right direction. Sometimes it may feel like you’re going backwards but you’re not. Our greatest concern is always for those that aren’t able to reach out for assistance for whatever reason, so please use the resources that are there for you. We really do want to help.

A Bit of Star Power at Community Northern Beaches!

In January, Community Northern Beaches played host for two weeks of filming for a new Australian movie drama to be titled “Unsound”. After an exhaustive search for a suitable location, our building, and in particular the Heritage Hall, was the set for ‘The Deaf Club’, the centrepiece of the drama.

‘Unsound’ follows the journey of a disillusioned musician whose romantic spark is ignited by a young trans man as they work together to save his community nightclub for the deaf.

‘Unsound’ stars British actor Reece Noi, and a who’s who of the Australian film and music industry including Christine Anu, Todd McKenney, Paula Duncan and Yiana Pandelis. It was directed by one of Australia’s premier directors of film and television; Ian Watson.

The whole filming process was incredibly smooth and offered staff, volunteers and clients a great insight into the energy and effort that goes into the making of a film.

Pictured on location in Manly with Community Northern Beaches Executive Director John Kelly, is Director Ian Watson on John’s right, and Location Manager Daniella on John’s left, plus crew.

Pictured on location in Manly with Community Northern Beaches Executive Director John Kelly, is Director Ian Watson on John’s right, and Location Manager Daniella on John’s left, plus crew.

Community Spotlight on Adele Heasman, President Community Northern Beaches

Adele Heasman has been a member of the Management Committee of Community Northern Beaches since 2002 and was nominated as President at the recent Annual General Meeting. As well as being a wife, mother and President, Adele also works in the Office of James Griffin MP for Manly as Senior Electorate Officer. We asked Adele to share a little about herself.

Q: Could you tell us a little about yourself?

Adele Heasman addresses the recent Community Northern Beaches’ Annual General Meeting

Adele Heasman addresses the recent Community Northern Beaches’ Annual General Meeting

Adele: “I have lived in the Manly area since starting at Balgowlah Heights Public School in year 1 after my parents built their home in the new land release in the early ‘60s. Growing up with the bush as my backyard was idyllic – as kids we loved the flannel flowers and indigenous rock carvings which we considered our very own to look after.

My husband and I have made Manly our home since 1984 (he also grew up in the area) with our 3 now grown-up children. In many ways, my love for the area was my reason for running for Manly Council as a Councillor in 1999. My new role here in the Electorate Office is really an extension to that – without me being at the forefront!”

Q: What is your role at Community Northern Beaches and responsibilities does this role have?

Adele: “In 2002 I was elected to the Management Committee of the Manly Community Centre (now Community Northern Beaches) – having seen their work from afar since the 1970s. In the early days of being on the Committee, I was probably a quiet observer although I certainly took part in any roles that were asked of me such as helping with the Manly Corso stalls, fundraisers, projects and undertaking Vice President duties.

I was first elected President in 2014 and last year stepped aside for 12 months after serving for the statutory 4 years. This year I was delighted to be once more asked to run as President. Community Northern Beaches has seen so many changes these past few years, I feel that the staff and volunteers could do with some stability in the leadership and I am happy to assist with that.”

Q: What motivated you to choose a volunteer position in social services?

Adele: “I guess I like to see people’s lives change for the good. A lifetime ago I was working as a legal secretary for a senior partner in a prominent Sydney Law Firm – I then had a sea change and left to complete an Associate Diploma in Social Welfare at the Institute of Western Sydney. Now my life revolves around the provision of social welfare – I’m not a good counsellor! But in my role at Community Northern Beaches, and certainly at the Electorate Office, I am in a position to advocate for social services provision in and for my community.”

Q: Tell me about a particularly memorable moment during your time at Community Northern Beaches?

Adele Heasman pictured with John Kelly

Adele Heasman pictured with John Kelly

Adele: “Memories of volunteers working together to raise money for Community Northern Beaches, Jacqui’s farewell after some 37 years, and who could forget attending the moving funerals of Ellie Hunt (the first President and founder with us of the Manly Women’s Shelter) and Pat Boydell (the long-time chair of the Northern Beaches Mental Health Support Group), but also more recently meeting John Kelly (our new Centre Manager) and being amazed that we found someone who loves Community Northern Beaches as much as we all do!”

Q: What do you believe makes Community Northern Beaches special?

Adele: “I think its’ innate ability to ‘draw you in’! Once you see what the work is that we do and whose lives we change, there’s no getting out! I’m immensely proud of the reputation Community Northern Beaches has, not just within the local community, but with the levels of Government (Federal, State & Local) as well as our relationships with the Police and other stakeholders. Community Northern Beaches has been the driving force in the establishment of NGOs that are now thriving independently of us, such as Pioneer Clubhouse and of course the Northern Beaches Women’s Shelter (formerly Manly Women’s Shelter) which now has formed Women’s Community Shelters and has 6 Shelters in NSW!”

Q: What would your advice be to someone looking to reach out for help but doesn’t know where to start?

Adele: “If a person comes into the electorate office we are fortunate as we can just walk people down to the other end of the street to Community Northern Beaches! I often suggest Community Northern Beaches as it’s a hub and the staff are really adept at summarising a person’s need and referring them to the best service to assist them. If people are capable, I suggest googling Community Northern Beaches and looking at our wonderful website to get an idea of how we can help.”

Community Northern Beaches Annual General Meeting 2018

On Friday 12 October 2018, Community Northern Beaches held their 2018 Annual General Meeting. A warm and friendly atmosphere prevailed as those who care about the organisation came together to cover official business, thank some of the organisations and people who have supported them during the past year and elect the Management Committee for the year ahead.

Adele Heasman, now President of Community Northern Beaches opened the meeting by welcoming honoured guests including James Griffin, MP, Mayor Michael Regan, new CEO of Northern Beaches Council; Ray Brownlee, Councillors and staff of Northern Beaches Council; Cr. Sue Heins, Cr. Pat Daley, Cr. Candy Bingham, Cr. Kyle Ferguson, Kylie Walshe, Rob Van Den Blink, Sandra Faase and Will Wrathall, Michelle Erofeyeff of FACS, former Patron and Mayor of Manly Council; Jean Hay, CEO of Royal Far west; Lyndsay Cane, Peter Jackson; Hall Jackson P/L, Sally Cornelius, and representatives from St. Matthews Church, Manly Congregational Church, Easylink Transport, Every Little Bit Helps, CatholicCare, Link Housing, Legal Aid; Ross Tomlin, Carmel McCarney (Sisterhood Clontarf), our CNB staff and volunteers, and members of the Management Committee. Adele then acknowledged the traditional owners of the land (Cammeraygal peoples) and paid respect to Elders past and present.

Adele Heasman, President with John Kelly, Manager

Adele Heasman, President with John Kelly, Manager

Adele proceeded to highlight the significant achievements of Community Northern Beaches over the last financial year, including the granting of DGR and PBI status to the organisation, and the expansion of services provided to the Northern Beaches’ community through increased partnerships with other service providers.

Adele focussed on the urgent requirement for more suitable accommodation to enable the organisation to increase service delivery to the Northern Beaches’ community and maintain the dignity of clients and community members who access our services and facility. Adele acknowledged the tireless work and dedication of all involved in the successful management and daily operation of the centre, especially during a period of significant change and improvement.

James Griffin MP, and patron for Community Northern Beaches, presented a passionate advocacy for the work of the organisation in the community. He outlined how the work that is undertaken with the marginalised in the Northern Beaches community focussed him on why he had made the decision to stand for office and advocate on behalf of all.

Treasurer Mr. Bill Barnes gave thanks on behalf of the Management Committee to the Auditor, Peter Jackson from Hall Jackson Pty. Ltd., for his assistance with the financials throughout the year.

Bill acknowledged our funders; FACS, SSI and Northern Beaches Council, for their confidence in and support of Community Northern Beaches. He also acknowledged that the Venue Hire income had increased and formed a key part of overall revenue. Bill concluded by stating that Community Northern Beaches is in a sound financial position, meeting all financial requirements, and with significant reserves in the bank.

John O’Connor, Public Officer, declared all positions vacant and invited nominations for the Executive and Management Committee Members. The following Members were elected unopposed:

Executive: President: Adele Heasman, Vice President: Mary Nelson,Treasurer: Bill Barnes, Secretary: Caroline Pearce
Management: Paula James, Kandy Tagg, Peter Wood

Community & Volunteer Awards:

John Kelly presented the following Community Service Awards to those identified as making a difference in the Community and the lives of others;

Michael & Rosalind Cockett – Manly Congregational Church for donating sandwiches every Monday over many years for the homeless

Blackmores – for donating Christmas hampers each year for distribution to individuals and families in need

Manly Library – for donating toys each Christmas to the children of our clients

Care Essentials – for providing basic necessities for the homeless and needy

Yousef Elafifi – who collects bread and other food items from Aldi and bakeries to assist us in feeding the homeless and needy

St Matthews Church Manly – ongoing support and assistance.

Carmel McCarneyThe Sisterhood Clontarf – contributions of volunteer work, fundraising and community awareness raising.

Volunteer Awards;

Caroline Pearce – reception volunteer and member of the Management Committee
Nora Takats – 9 years continuous volunteer service and JP
Cathie McNabb – volunteer on reception and special projects
Julia Denne – volunteer on reception and worked for four years with CNB’s multicultural program supporting migrants and refugees
Lynda Stokes – for many years has organised CNB’s OzHarvest support for the homeless and needy conducted each Wednesday

Thank you to all those who attended and continue to show support for Community Northern Beaches.

The Sisterhood with Tracey Spicer – Sell Out Event for Local Charities!

Thank you to The Real Tracey Spicer and The Sisterhood for an amazing night. It was a sell out event with over 300 locals experiencing the wit and wisdom of Tracey Spicer who generously donated her time to help local charities. $12,000 was raised on the evening to be evenly distributed between Community Northern Beaches , Northern Beaches Women’s Shelter, Dalwood Spilstead and Bringa Women’s and Children’s Refuge.

So many supporters made this night possible with Balgowlah RSLdonating the venue, James Griffin MP, Member for Manly providing the introduction, and other locals and businesses donating their time and prizes for the evening.

Tracey Spicer

Tracey Spicer

Tracey Spicer is an iconoclast. The television, radio, newspaper and online journalist is now a highly sought-after writer, speaker and trainer. Renowned for the courage of her convictions, passion for social justice, and commitment to equality, Tracey was a perfect representative of the values of The Sisterhood and the charities they represent. Many women visited Tracey after the speech to share their own stories.

To all those who attended, thank you for your support. Community Northern Beaches will benefit greatly from the funds donated which will be used to support our clients who are experiencing homelessness, family and domestic violence, new immigrant settlement and family welfare. To our friends at Clontarf Sisterhood, thank you for your ongoing support not only raising funds but also increasing awareness within the Northern Beaches Community.

James Griffin MP with Tracey Spicer

James Griffin MP with Tracey Spicer

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Community Spotlight on John Kelly

John Kelly, Manager Community Northern Beaches

What is your role?

My role is incredibly varied, I’m called upon to do everything in a real “all hands on deck” environment. I have a strategic and business focus to manage today and into the future to ensure we can continue to deliver services to the community. Building partnerships and relationships with government, corporate and other NFP’s is critical. We have managed to build the largest community hub on the Northern Beaches with 18 accommodated services in-house plus a number of other partnerships supporting programmes off-site. There is also mundane parts of the role like changing light bulbs, emptying rubbish and any heavy lifting! That helps me stay grounded in the role, as you can’t be precious with the work we do.

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Can you describe a typical day in your life at the centre?

A typical day can be quite chaotic as I never know what might be around the corner. Our varied client base certainly keeps us on our toes. Of course in my role I can never escape the paperwork but this tends to occur around ensuring clients, customers and accommodated services are all properly looked after. People come before paper. My quiet time is before and after we open the doors, and this is the opportunity to write reports and respond to correspondence.

What motivated you to choose a career in community services?

I chose a career in community services after working in local government where I spent 14 years across four Councils. I wanted to be in an environment where I had the opportunity to explore new ways to do things. Working in smaller, more under resourced environments makes you think outside the box, act with agility and a strength of purpose to achieve outcomes for your clients who are all having a worse day than you are.

Tell me about a particularly memorable moment during your time at Community Northern Beaches?

There have been many memorable moments since starting my role at Community Northern Beaches. From an organisational viewpoint changing our name, logo and marketing was a terrific team effort and a significant way forward to take us across the Beaches.

Getting DGR/PBI* status after many years of knockbacks was sensational for Community Northern Beaches and particularly our team who work so hard. Also, last year we held the first ever Client Festive Celebration, it was a truly uplifting experience for not only our clients but staff, volunteers and our great supporters The Clontarf Sisterhood.

What do you believe makes Community Northern Beaches special?

I think what makes our centre special is the people involved and the effort that they put in. If this was mirrored across the whole of society, we would be in a better space as a community and a country.

What would your advice be to someone looking to reach out for help but doesn’t know where to start?

My advice to anyone looking for help who doesn’t know where to start is to look for a community organisation first. They may or may not be able to address your needs but they will definitely give you the time and attention you need to help you begin your journey. The compassion and empathy is there with staff and volunteers, and this is often what people seeking support need the most.

*DGR: A deductible gift recipient (DGR) is an entity or fund that can receive tax deductible gifts

*PBI: A public benevolent institution (PBI) is a charity whose main purpose is to relieve poverty, sickness, suffering or disability.

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Related Stories:

Homelessness on the Northern Beaches

Daniel Peterson, Community Northern Beaches Homeless Outreach worker shares with us about people experiencing homelessness on Sydney’s Northern Beaches and what our centre is trying to do to help.

Click here to read the full story…?